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What a treat. Glamorous and nostalgic and very sexy, Cape May is a novel about marriage, lust, shabby seaside towns and lots of gin. Brilliantly unsettling—one of those books that stays with you.”

Paula Hawkins, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Girl on the Train

A dozy, luxurious sense of enchantment comes over the story, until the rude awakening at its finale. … “Cape May” does something better than critique or satirize: It seduces.

Sam Sacks, The Wall Street Journal

Earthy and sensual, raw and real, Cape May is an exquisitely crafted exploration of young love, the power of desire, and the lifelong ramifications of choices made in an instant. Cheek’s virtuosic prose reads like a modern classic, piercing through the veneer of male sexual fantasies of the 1950s and rendering a heartbreaking portrait of a man—and a marriage—undone by betrayal.

—Whitney Scharer, author of The Age of Light

Cape May is a perfectly mixed cocktail of beauty, desire, and heady desperation. In his gorgeous debut novel, Chip Cheek offers his readers a portrait of mid-century America and the timeless allure of love on the rocks.

—Bret Anthony Johnston, author of Corpus Christi and internationally bestselling Remember Me Like This

Deceptively relaxed and simple at first...[Cape May] soon reveals itself as a swirling vortex of psychological suspense with insights about marriage that recall writers like Margot Livesey and Alice Munro. The 1950s setting, the pellucid prose, and the propulsive plot make this very steamy debut novel about morality and desire feel like a classic.

Kirkus, Starred Review

This remarkable debut novel offers a sobering reminder of how the possibilities of life, when first encountered, often carry their own riptide.

Booklist, Starred Review

Cheek’s glamorous and nostalgic first novel is an atmospheric tale of sexual longing and loss in 1950s America that nods to classics like The Great Gatsby and Revolutionary Road.

The Independent

Cheek’s strong debut is a psychodrama that shows just how easily people can be manipulated. Cheek does a good job with his cast; Henry and Effie are finely drawn and their slide from innocence starkly depicted. The novel’s ending is particularly startling—a memorable final note in this cogent examination of marital infidelity and betrayal.

Publishers Weekly